All posts filed under: Asia

Travelogue Japan: Kumano Kodo, Part III “Dancing Ferns”

I hope you enjoy this short series about my experience walking the Kumano Kodo (熊野古道) with my sister and mother in April 2017. Kumano is the name of the mountainous region at the heart of the Kii Peninsula in the Wakayama prefecture of Japan. ‘Kodo’ is Japanese for an ancient road. The Kumano Kodo is an extensive network of ancient […]

Travelogue Japan: Kumano Kodo, Part II “花鳥風月 Flower, Bird, Wind, Moon”

I hope you enjoy this short series about my experience walking the Kumano Kodo (熊野古道) with my sister and mother in April 2017. Kumano is the name of the mountainous region at the heart of the Kii Peninsula in the Wakayama prefecture of Japan. ‘Kodo’ is Japanese for an ancient road. The Kumano Kodo is an extensive network of ancient pilgrimage routes that travel through the Kii Peninsula and mountain ranges. For over 1,000 years people have made the journey to Kumano to undergo physical strain and solitude to gain wisdom and enlightenment. The trails pass through significant sites of both Shinto and Buddhism religion. While my purposes for this pilgrimage weren’t (directly) tied to religion, it was incredible to be immersed in a place with such historic significance and of natural beauty. What I write, like most others posts, are a reflection on my experiences – the feelings and thoughts that came with the journey, so please don’t take my writing as a guide of any sorts. Most of the words are taken straight from a scribbled journal that I kept …

Travelogue Japan: Kumano Kodo, Part I “the uphill climb”

I hope you enjoy this short series about my experience walking the Kumano Kodo (熊野古道) with my sister and mother in April 2017. Kumano is the name of the mountainous region at the heart of the Kii Peninsula in the Wakayama prefecture of Japan. ‘Kodo’ is Japanese for an ancient road. The Kumano Kodo is an extensive network of ancient pilgrimage routes that travel through the Kii Peninsula and mountain ranges. For over 1,000 years people have made the journey to Kumano to undergo physical strain and solitude to gain wisdom and enlightenment. The trails pass through significant sites of both Shinto and Buddhism religion. While my purposes for this pilgrimage weren’t (directly) tied to religion, it was incredible to be immersed in a place with such historic significance and of natural beauty. What I write, like most others posts, are a reflection on my experiences – the feelings and thoughts that came with the journey, so please don’t take my writing as a guide of any sorts. Most of the words are taken straight from a scribbled journal that I kept …